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HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS IN SCHOOLS

Home >> Resources for Schools >> Schools Chemical List


Page of 103 | 1,029 records |
Chemical NameAcute Exposure HazardChronic Exposure HazardEnvironmental ToxicityHazard RankLowest Grade Level AllowedStorage CategoryExperiments Where Used
Abscisic Acid No acute toxicity data reported No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported No fish toxicity data 1 Elementary demos only O-1 Botany - effects of plant hormones
Acetal Explosion risk from peroxide formation. Flammable. Slightly toxic by ingestion & skin contact. Irritant. No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported No fish toxicity data 5 Ban Candidate O-3 Flam Cabinet NONE
Acetaldehyde Explosion risk from peroxide formation. Flammable. Slightly toxic by inhalation, ingestion and skin contact. Irritant to eyes. Liver function impairment Toxic to fish 5 Ban Candidate O-3 Flam Cabinet NONE. Formerly used as: Organic substrate in organic reactions.
Acetamide Slightly toxic by ingestion No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported Non-toxic to fish 2 Middle School O-2 Melting points. Heat of fusion (enthalpy) experiments.
Acetanilide Slightly toxic by ingestion. Irritant No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported No fish toxicity data 3 High School O-2 Organic substrate used in organic reactions.
Acetic Acid (<1 Molar) Irritant. No acute toxicity data reported at this dilute concentration. No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported Non-toxic to fish 0 All grades Misc Volcano experiment (tame version). Neutralizing base spills.
Acetic Acid (>6 Molar) Combustible liquid and vapor. Corrosive. Toxic by skin contact. Slightly toxic by ingestion. Erosion of teeth. Chronic lung impairment. Non-toxic to fish 3 High School O-1 Flam Cabinet Ester lab. Scent lab. Plant mitosis microscopy staining. Stock acid solution.
Acetic Acid (1 Molar to 6 Molar) Corrosive. Slightly toxic by skin contact and ingestion. Erosion of teeth. Chronic lung impairment Non-toxic to fish 2 Middle School O-1 Stoichiometry. Mole ratio.
Acetic Anhydride Water reactive. Flammable. Corrosive. Slightly toxic by ingestion & skin contact. Irritant. Drug precursor. Theft risk. No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported Non-toxic to fish 4 High School w/ chem hygiene officer approval. Storage limit: 100 milliliters. O-1 Flam Cabinet Compounding of aspirin. Organic substrate. Thermochemistry. Restricted to advanced placement science.
Aceto Carmine Corrosive. Slightly toxic by ingestion and inhalation. No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported Non-toxic to fish 2 Middle School O-9 Plant mitosis microscopy staining. Cell and bacteria stain.
Page of 103 | 1,029 records |

   Glossary of Terms...  
Acute Exposure Hazard
(UW) An adverse effect on a human or animal body, with severe symptoms developing rapidly and coming quickly to a crisis.

Anemia
Condition where the blood contains too few red blood cells or has a reduced capacity to transport oxygen. Can be caused by chemical destruction of red blood cells. Causes fatigue and other symptoms.

Asthmagen
(http://www.hse.gov.uk/asthma/asthmagen.pdf) (http://www.aoec.org/content/Asthmagen_Protocol_4-9-05_revision.doc) Substances which can cause asthmatic reactions in sensitized individuals. (UW) Asthma is a disease characterized by recurrent attacks of dyspnea, wheezing, and perhaps coughing due to spasmodic contraction of the bronchioles.
Related topic helpful link...  www.hse.gov.uk/asthma/asthmagen.pdfwww.aoec.org/content/Asthmagen_Protocol_4-9-05_revision.doc

Ban Candidate
Compounds that have little to no educational usefulness in secondary schools, are very hazardous via skin contact, inhalation or through physical effects (fire, explosion, corrosion, etc.) These chemicals are not commercially available from the usual chemical suppliers for secondary schools. Ban Candidates include all mercury compounds and elemental mercury, which are prohibited to be stored, purchased or used in Washington State schools under the Revised Codes of Washington State (Chapter 70.95M RCW).

Banned in schools in these States & Provinces
An ongoing review of the literature and state regulations show that these chemicals are banned from use in schools in the listed states.

Carcinogen
Studies show that these substance can cause cancer in humans. Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) uses reviews by OSHA, IARC, ACGIH, and DFG MAK to determine listing as a carcinogen. This database notes only "probable" and "confirmed" carcinogens.

CAS Number
(http://cas.org) Chemical Abstracts Services Registry Number. Numeric designation assigned by the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstracts Service to identify each specific chemical compound.

Chemical Name
Chemical name of the material as seen in listings from chemical supply companies such as Flinn Scientific, Carolina Biological Supply, and JT Baker. Also includes common synonyms and synonyms from older naming protocols.

Choking vapors
Chemical gases, vapors or mists which, on inhalation, cause coughing, tearing and respiratory distress.

Chronic Exposure Hazard
(UW) Effects resulting from repeated doses of or exposures to a substance over a relatively prolonged period of time.

Clarifying details on concentration or form
Notes on common names, components of a mixture, solution strength etc.

Combustible
(UW) A term used by NFPA, DOT, and others to classify certain liquids that will burn, on the basis of flash points. Both NFPA and DOT generally define combustible liquids as having a flash point of 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C) or higher. Non-liquid substances such as wood and paper are classified as ordinary combustibles by NFPA. For the purposes of this database, we are classifying materials as combustible that are not flammable (NFPA term) or ignitable (Hazardous Waste Regulations term).

Controlled substance
Drugs and substances with a potential for abuse are regulated by the US Drug Enforcement Administration. Formal authorization from the DEA is required for possession of DEA regulated drugs. Civil and criminal penalties apply. (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/pubs/csa/812.htm#c)

Corrosive
A corrosive can be either an acid or a base. (UW) A chemical that causes visible destruction of, or irreversible alterations in living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact; or a liquid that has a severe corrosion rate on steel. Substances with a pH at or below 2.0 or at or above 12.5 may be regulated as corrosive hazardous wastes.(WAC 173-303)

Decomposition (releases irritating ammonia gas).
The breakdown of a single phase into two or more phases. (IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology 2nd Edition (1997)) Over time chemicals can break down due to exposure to moisture, heat, light, etc. to constituents that may have different properties than the original compound.

DOT
US Department of Transportation. Regulates transportation of hazardous chemicals.

Drug precursor
(International Narcotics Control Board) Chemicals frequently used in the illicit manufacture of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances. (http://www.incb.org/pdf/precursors-report/2007/en/precursors-report-2007.pdf)

Experiments - Processes Where Used
A listing of experiments which make use of the named compound. Most of the data was provided by Doug Mandt, retired science teacher and long time safety committee chairperson for the Washington Science Teacher's Asssociation. Stain data provided by http://101science.com/Stains.html. Other info provided by Small Scale Chemistry Institute, Flinn Scientific Catalog, teachers from Northshore, Lake Washington school districts in particular and many other science teachers during lab inspections.

Explosive
(UW) A material that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous release of pressure, gas, and heat when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.

Flammable
(UW) Any solid, lquid, vapor or gas that will ignite easily and burn rapidly. A flammable liquid is defined by NFPA and DOT as a liquid with a flash point below 100 degress F (37.8 degrees C). For the purposes of this database, we have classifed materials as flammable if they are both flammable (NFPA term) and ignitable (Hazardous Waste Regulations term); i.e., materials that have a closed cup flash point at or below 140 degrees F.

Flammable solid
(UW and DOT) A solid that will ignite easily and burn rapidly. Includes desensitized explosives, self-reactive materials that are thermally unstable and that can undergo a strongly exothermic (heat-evolving) decomposition even without the participation of oxygen (air), or readily combustible solid like matches, pyrophoric materials, and dangerous when wet and self-heating materials capable of spontaneous combustion.

Frequency of purchase & use per Flinn
Flinn Scientific is a major supplier of school chemicals and includes in its catalog a ranking of how commonly chemicals are sold to schools. We used this ranking to help us determine how useful certain chemicals are in schools.

Hazard Rank
Hazard rank is a short-hand quick assessment of comparative hazards. 0 is very low hazard and relatively safe for students to handle. 5 is extremely hazardous (physically &/or toxicologically) AND has little-to-no educational utility in primary or secondary schools.

Highly unstable
Compounds that can undergo explosive decomposition with little initiation when in concentrated form or degraded. Many can explode on contact with air or light.

Irritant
(UW) (Stanford) Irritants are chemicals that are not corrosive, but cause reversible inflammatory effects on living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact.

Lachrymator
"A lachrymatory agent or lachrymator is a chemical compound that irritates the eyes to cause tears, pain, and even temporary blindness. Several commonly used chemicals are lachrymators; for example, bromoacetone, benzylchloride, thiophene, xylyl bromide, chlorine, and bromine. The word "lachrymatory" comes from the Latin lacrima meaning "a tear"." From http://explanation-guide.info/meaning/Lachrymatory-agent.html the Explanation Guide Encyclopedia.

LC50
(UW) Lethal Concentration 50. A single dose of a material that on the basis of laboratoy tests is expected to kill 50% of a group of test animals. The LC50 dose is usually expressed as milligrams or grams of material per liter of water or air (mg/L or g/L). See Tox X, A, B, C, and D for LC50 hazardous waste designation levels.

LD50
(UW) Lethal Dose 50. A single dose of a material that on the basis of laboratoy tests is expected to kill 50% of a group of test animals. The LD50 dose is usually expressed as milligrams or grams of material per kilogram of animal weight (mg/kg or g/kg). See Tox X, A, B, C, and D for LD50 hazardous waste designation levels.

Low toxicity
Low toxicity chemicals are those that have some hazardous characteristic data associated with them but the level of toxicity does not meet the minimum levels that would cause them to designate as Tox D in Washington State.

Minimum grade level & defined restrictions
Grade level below which use of this chemical in the classroom is not recommended. Defined restrictions are primarily based on input from Doug Mandt of the Washington Science Teacher's Association, input and discussions with science teachers from the Lake Washington, Northshore, Seattle, Renton and Bellevue school districts.These recommended restrictions incorporate the usefulness of the compound, based on availability from suppliers, and its hazards. Chemicals with significant hazards that can be easily taken up via inhalation or skin contact are restricted to higher grade levels or recommended for banning.

Molar (<1M, 1-6M, >6M)
The molar concentration of a solution, usually expressed as the number of moles of solute per liter of solution. The ranges listed are those commonly found for acids and bases in secondary schools. Solutions with concentrations over 6.0 Molar are considered concentrated. Those below 1.0 molar are considered very dilute. 0.1 molar solutions are commonly used in Small Scale Chemistry lab exercises.

MSDS
Material Safety Data Sheet. Schools are required to have an MSDS for any chemical or product they use. Manufacturers and Suppliers are required to supply MSDSs when they are requested. MSDSs contain information about a compound's physical characteristics, hazards, personal protection requirements and spill clean up information. MSDSs are also available on-line. Try www.ilpi.com/msds or a web search for the chemical or manufacturer. We often typed the chemical's name and the letters MSDS in a search engine for information.

Mutagen
(UW) A substance or agent capable of altering the genetic material in a living cell. Noted here only if Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) says human mutagen data reported and EPA Genetic Toxicology Program cited.

Neurotoxin by inhalation, ingestion or skin contact
Neurotoxins are substances that cause adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS), including confusion, fatigue, irritability, CNS toxicity and encephalopathy. Peripheral neurotoxins can cause weakness in the extremities, tingling in the limbs (paresthesia), and loss of coordination. Adapted from http://www.scorecard.org/health-effects/explanation.tcl?short_hazard_name=neuro

NFPA Flamm
National Fire Protection Association numerical code that rates chemicals under fire conditions in four categories - health, flammability, reactivity, and unusual reactivity. NFPA ratings used in this database are based on data from Michigan State University (http://www.hazmat.msu.edu:591/nfpa/) and from the Vermont Safety Information Resources Inc. (SIRI) MSDS database (http://hazard.com/msds/index.php). We found Fisher Scientific and Mallinckrodt Baker MSDS's to be helpful as well.

NFPA Health
National Fire Protection Association numerical code that rates chemicals under fire conditions in four categories - health, flammability, reactivity, and unusual reactivity. NFPA ratings used in this database are based on data from Michigan State University (http://www.hazmat.msu.edu:591/nfpa/) and from the Vermont Safety Information Resources Inc. (SIRI) MSDS database (http://hazard.com/msds/index.php). We found Fisher Scientific and Mallinckrodt Baker MSDS's to be helpful as well.

NFPA Ratings
National Fire Protection Association numerical code that rates chemicals under fire conditions in four categories - health, flammability, reactivity, and unusual reactivity. NFPA ratings used in this database are based on data from Michigan State University (http://www.hazmat.msu.edu:591/nfpa/) and from the Vermont Safety Information Resources Inc. (SIRI) MSDS database (http://hazard.com/msds/index.php). We found Fisher Scientific and Mallinckrodt Baker MSDS's to be helpful as well.

NFPA React
National Fire Protection Association numerical code that rates chemicals under fire conditions in four categories - health, flammability, reactivity, and unusual reactivity. NFPA ratings used in this database are based on data from Michigan State University (http://www.hazmat.msu.edu:591/nfpa/) and from the Vermont Safety Information Resources Inc. (SIRI) MSDS database (http://hazard.com/msds/index.php). We found Fisher Scientific and Mallinckrodt Baker MSDS's to be helpful as well.

NFPA Special
National Fire Protection Association numerical code that rates chemicals under fire conditions in four categories - health, flammability, reactivity, and unusual reactivity. NFPA ratings used in this database are based on data from Michigan State University (http://www.hazmat.msu.edu:591/nfpa/) and from the Vermont Safety Information Resources Inc. (SIRI) MSDS database (http://hazard.com/msds/index.php). We found Fisher Scientific and Mallinckrodt Baker MSDS's to be helpful as well.

No acute toxicity date reported
Reviews of data from several sources including Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) and JT Baker MSDS's show no data on acute exposure hazards of this chemical. The chemical is not found on hazardous materials lists. This notation should not necessarily be interpreted to mean the chemical is non-hazardous since many chemicals have not been tested for toxicity or reproductive hazards.

No confirmed human disease-related or reproductive hazard data reported.
Reviews of data from several sources including Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) and JT Baker MSDS's show no data on chronic exposure hazards of this chemical. The chemical is not found on hazardous materials lists. This notation should not necessarily be interpreted to mean the chemical is non-hazardous since many chemicals have not been tested for toxicity or reproductive hazards.

No fish toxicity data
EPA's ECOTOX database (http://cfpub.epa.gov/ecotox/quick_query.htm) contains data on toxicity to fish. Where data was available that met the state hazardous waste criteria under WAC 173-303 it was used to determine fish toxicity. Where data was lacking or species, study type or other issues did not meet WAC 173-303 we note "No fish toxicity data". This should not be taken to mean the chemical is non-toxic to fish, only that any existing data didn't meet our criteria.

No hazardous characteristics reported.
No acute or chronic hazardous characteristics were documented in our reference literature or in chemical MSDS records we reviewed. This notation should not necessarily be interpreted to mean the chemical is non-hazardous since many chemicals have not been tested for toxicity or reproductive hazards.

No toxicity data
Reviews of data from several sources including Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.), data from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health and JT Baker's and other company's MSDSs show no data on toxicity of this chemical. The chemical is not found on hazardous materials lists. This notation should not necessarily be interpreted to mean the chemical is non-toxic since many chemicals have not been tested for toxicity or reproductive hazards.

Non-toxic to fish
EPA's ECOTOX database (http://cfpub.epa.gov/ecotox/quick_query.htm) contains data on toxicity to fish. Where data was available that met the state hazardous waste criteria under WAC 173-303 it was used to determine fish toxicity. Where data was lacking or species, study type or other issues did not meet WAC 173-303 we note "No fish toxicity data". This should not be taken to mean the chemical is non-toxic to fish, only that any existing data didn't meet our criteria.

Other CAS Numbers (w/ no change in hazards)
See CAS. Chemical Abstracts Services Registry Number. Some very similar chemical compounds carry different CAS Numbers. We have noted all where deemed appropriate.

Other name seen on labels
Chemical name of the material. Also common synonyms and synonyms from older naming protocols. We decided not to use standard IUPAC nomenclature, since chemical labels that teachers and inspectors are viewing almost never follow that naming system.

Other name seen on labels
Chemical name of the material. Also common synonyms and synonyms from older naming protocols. We decided not to use standard IUPAC nomenclature, since chemical labels that teachers and inspectors are viewing almost never follow that naming system.

Oxidizer
(UW) Chemicals, other than blasting agents or explosives, that initiate or promote combustion in other materials, thereby causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.

P-listed. Extremely hazardous.
(UW) (EPA)The EPA has determined that some substances are hazardous by definition and placed them on lists. The P-list includes specific discarded commercial chemical products that are listed due to their severe acute toxicity and other hazardous characteristics. In Washington State chemicals and mixtures that designate as WT01 are Extremely Hazardous Wastes.

Peroxide forming compound
(Sigma-Aldrich) Substances which undergo auto-oxidation under normal storage conditions to form unstable and potentially dangerous peroxide by-products. This process is catalyzed by light and/or heat and occurs when susceptible materials are exposed to atmospheric oxygen. (UW) Chemicals that may become shock sensitive or explosive when they oxidize to form an appreciable concentration of peroxides. Once opened, these compounds become exposed to air and the auto-oxidation process can begin. Twisting the cap can be enough to initiate an explosive reaction. Store in airtight containers in a dark, cool and dry place. Do not keep beyond expiration date!

Persistant bioaccumulative toxin
(EPA) Persistent bioaccumulatieve toxins (PBTs) are chemicals that are toxic, persist in the environment and bioaccumulate in food chains and thus pose risks to human health and ecosystems. The biggest concerns about PBTs are that they transfer rather easily among air, water, and land, and span boundaries of programs, geography, and generations. Noted here when they meet the criteria as PBT in WAC 173-303 or are listed by the WRPPN (Western Regional Pollution Prevention Network).

Poison
(medicinenet.com and Sax) Any substance that can cause severe distress or death if ingested, breathed in, or absorbed through the skin. For the purposes of this database, poisons are any chemical that meets the Toxicity Category of Washington State levels X, A or B (as noted in Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) and updated to reflect review by UW EH&S Department of data from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances).

Poison gas
See Poison. A chemical that is poisonous and a gas at room temperature. Chemicals that carry the DOT designation of 'poison gas' are included.

Pyrophoric
(from Vanderbilt U.) Pyrophoric chemicals are liquids or solids that will react spontaneously in air at a temperature of 130 degrees F (54.4 degrees C) or below. Includes compounds that are air reactive, catching fire when exposed to the atmosphere.

Radioactive
An unstable atomic nucleus spontaneously emits particles and energy in a process known as radioactive decay. This phenomenon is observed in the heavy elements, like uranium, and unstable isotopes, like carbon-14. Listed here when noted as radioactive by Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.)

Reactive
(UW, Stanford U. and WAC 173-303) Reactive chemicals are normally unstable and readily undergo chemical reaction with the release of energy. They have the potential to vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or become self-reactive under conditions of shock, pressure, temperature, light or contact with another material. They can react violently with, or form potentially explosive mixtures with water or air. When mixed with water or air they can generate toxic gases, vapors or fumes in a quantity sufficient to present a danger to human health or the environment.

Reacts with acids to form poisonous cyanide gas.
(UW) Reactive chemicals have a tendency to undergo chemical reaction. Cyanides, ferricyandes and ferrocyanides can react with acids in use or storage creating poisonous cyanide gas.

Reacts with acids to form poisonous hydrogen sulfide gas.
(UW) Reactive chemicals have a tendency to undergo chemical reaction. Sulfide compounds can react with acids in use or storage creating poisonous and flammable hydrogen sulfide gas.

Recommended disposal method
Appropriate treatment and disposal methods for quantities of these chemicals typically generated by secondary school chemistry laboratories. These disposal methods are acceptable in King County, Washington, based on the regulations in King County and the state of Washington. Disposal regulations may be more or less restrictive in other areas. Contact your local hazardous waste representative and sewer utility to verify disposal methods in your region. If you are in another state, a good online resource to understand your chemical waste treatment options can be found at this EPA website http://www.epa.gov/sbo/pdfs/hazwaste_500.pdf

Reported as [toxic, poison, chronic health effects]
Chemicals that lack hazardous characteristic data in our standard references (Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) JT Baker, WAC 173-303) and are therefore not toxic per Washington's hazardous waste regulations, but some anecdotal hazardous characteristics were discussed in these and other sources and noted during our research.

RTECS
Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS ®)

Sensitizer
(UW and Stanford) A substance that on first exposure may cause little or no reaction, but which on subsequent exposure may cause a marked response, or allergic reaction, not necessarily limited to the contact site. Skin sensitization is the most common form but respiratory sensitization can also occur with a few chemicals. Common sensitizers found in labs include formaldehyde, phenol derivatives, and latex proteins (found in lab gloves).

Slightly toxic by inhalation, ingestion or skin contact
Chemicals shown to meet Washington's Toxicity Category D, the lowest level of toxicity that would cause a material to designate as a Washington State-only hazardous waste. Researched in Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) and updated with RTECS data after a review by UW EH&S.

Sold by Carolina Bio Supply to Schools?
Carolina Biological Supply is a major supplier of school chemicals. Noted here if sold in their on-line catalog.

Sold by Sargent Welch to Schools?
Sargent Welch is a major supplier of school chemicals. Noted here if sold in their on-line catalog.

Stench
A strong distinctive odor that is offensively unpleasant. Not defined in the literature.

Storage Category
The designation for a compatible chemical storage system based on chemical families described in the book Prudent Practices in the Laboratory (National Research Council). This system is compatible with the one recommended by Flinn Scientific Inc. and JT Baker which allows for chemicals to be safely stored. If you click on the word “storage category” in the database, the chemical list will sort by storage category alphabetically. What you’ll see is that chemicals with the same storage category share the same hazardous characteristics. It’s a system designed to keep incompatible chemicals away from each other. Categories preceded by the letter “O” are organic compounds, those with an “I” are inorganic. GO HERE (hyperlink) for details of a compatible storage system for very small storage spaces.

Teratogen
(UW) An agent or substance that causes physical defects in the developing embryo. Noted here when Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) indicated experimental teratogenic effects or documented human effects.

Toxic by ingestion, inhalation and/or skin contact.
Mixtures and dilutions that range between slightly toxic and poisonous depending on the dilution rate. These compounds will designate as Toxic - Category C under the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-30) at the listed concentration. Not defined in the literature.

Toxic by inhalation, ingestion or skin contact
Chemicals shown to meet Washington's Toxicity Category C. Researched in Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (11th ed.) and updated with RTECS data after a review by UW EH&S.

Toxic to fish
EPA's ECOTOX database (http://cfpub.epa.gov/ecotox/quick_query.htm) contains data on toxicity to fish. Where data was available that met the criteria for WAC 173-303 it was used to determine fish toxicity. Compounds that are listed as Toxic to fish had LC50 data within the range listed as Toxic Category C in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations.

UW or UW EH&S
University of Washington Environmental Health and Safety Department. Staff from UW EH&S provide invaluable assistance in the development of this database at every step along the way. We are grateful for their support. The UW EH&S Laboratroy Safety Manual is an excellent resource and template http://www.ehs.washington.edu/manuals/lsm/ . The glossary of that manual contains additional definitions of terms often used in science labs and waste management settings. http://www.ehs.washington.edu/manuals/lsm/lsmb.pdf

WA-only Code 1
Disposal codes used in the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations for shipping papers. Describes the hazardous characteristics of the material

WA-only Code 2
Disposal codes used in the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations for shipping papers. Describes the hazardous characteristics of the material

WAC 173-303
Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations Chapter 173-303 WAC. Administered by the Washington State Department of Ecology

Water reactive
(UW) A chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a health hazard. Also noted here are chemicals defined by DOT as "Dangerous when wet".

www.ilpi.com/msds
Interactive Learning Paradigms Incorporated hosts an excellent reference website on all things relating to MSDSs. See their website for links to many on-line MSDSs as well as definitons and other safety information.

   Help & FAQs ...  
How’d you choose these chemicals?
Over 98% of the chemicals on the list have been seen in secondary schools in Washington State during both the King County and Washington State Rehab the Lab Projects. The others were listed as chemicals of concern in schools by the American Chemical Society.
Related topic helpful link...  membership.acs.org/C/CCS/pubs/NotInSecondarySchools.pdf

What’s “Hazard Rank”?
Hazard rank is a short-hand quick assessment of comparative hazards. 0 is very low hazard and relatively safe for students to handle. 5 is extremely hazardous (physically &/or toxicologically) AND has little-to-no educational utility in primary or secondary schools.

What’s “Minimum Grade Level Restrictions” mean?
This is our attempt to provide recommendations for the minimum grade level curriculum that should use these chemicals. The rating is based on three factors: 1) the chemical’s comparative hazards, 2) if the chemical is sold by one of the three major chemical supply companies for schools (Flinn Scientific, Carolina Biological Supply or Sargent Welch), and 3) the frequency of use in experiments in specific grade-level chemistry. For instance, Acetic Anhydride is used in the manufacture of aspirin in Advanced Placement organic chemistry (AP Chem). AP Chem is college-credited curriculum taught to high school students.

What’s “Storage Category”?
If you click on the word “storage category” in the database, it will sort it alphabetically. What you’ll see is that chemicals with the same storage category share the same hazardous characteristics. It’s a system designed to keep incompatible chemicals away from each other. Categories preceded by the letter “O” are organic compounds, those with an “I” are inorganic.
Related topic helpful link...  www.lbl.gov/ehs/chsp/html/storage.shtml

What’s a CAS #?
CAS stands for chemical abstract system. CAS numbers are unique for each form of a compound. Most chemicals only have one CAS number. Some, like sodium borate can have 5 or more.
Related topic helpful link...  www.cas.org/expertise/cascontent/registry/regsys.html

Who’s the intended audience for the School Chemicals Database?
The intended audience is public and private primary & secondary school science teachers, risk managers and purchasing agents. However, the database is also a very useful tool for public health, safety and health, and environmental inspectors visiting any kind of laboratory. It is also useful for people wishing to know the hazards of one of the ingredients of a commercially available product.